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Lovers of offbeat music and hard-core rap would probably never use the names "Weird Al Yankovic" and "2 Live Crew" in the same sentence. Yet, they have something very important in common. The law protects their use of other people's musical works. The reason is that courts consider both 2 Live Crew's rap combined with pop music riffs and Weird Al's combination of everything... to be parodies, which are protected under fair use doctrine. more...

- Copyrights

The Supreme Court will soon be hearing oral arguments and handing down a decision that could greatly affect how we view the upcoming presidential election—on television at least. The debate is over whether so-called issue ads, those that endorse specific causes and are funded by labor unions, special interest groups, and corporations, can be banned 60 days before a general election and 30 days before a primary; such ads are prohibited from even mentioning a particular candidate or party. more...

- Freedom of Speech

When California man, Michael Buday, promised to take his fiancee's last name when they got married, he didn't envision the legal battle in his future. Buday wanted to honor his wife by changing his last name to hers. However, he quickly discovered that it is more difficult for a man to take his wife's name than the other way around. more...

- Family Law Basics

In November of 2001, President George Bush, as part of his war on terror, issued an executive order which authorized the trial of those persons considered "enemy combatants" but would not allow them to "invoke rights under any other body of law, U.S. or international" and that "justice was to be dispensed swiftly, close to where our forces may be fighting, without years of pretrial proceedings or post-trial appeals." The commission was first put to use in 2004 when Salim Ahmed Hamdan was captured and sold to the United States. He was sent directly to the Guatanamo Naval Base in Cuba. more...

- Equal Protection

The recent drug and sex scandal involving Reverend Ted Haggard, founder of the New Life Church, raised questions about the truthfulness of religious leaders. But when Haggard's alleged former lover failed a lie detector test, another set of questions involving the machine itself came into play. So how reliable are lie detectors? And, are they admissible in court? more...

- Technology

When a student is suicidal, what should the university do? Or, more precisely, what is the university's legal duty, if any? These are questions that many universities are struggling to answer. Although many schools provide adequate counseling services, an increasing number of schools are resorting to banning students who have attempted suicide or who are suicidal from university housing. more...

- Privacy

For years, extensive court coverage was something left to the newspapers. Even then, it was left to the back pages unless they involved major crimes. That was before the O.J. Simpson trial. Now trial coverage is a regular part of local news programming. In the last few years, there has been a push for the nation's highest court to do the same.Read more to find out if the Supreme Court may allow cameras in court. more...

- In the Courtroom

A debate has been brewing in Congress, in the business world, and on the Internet over a basic concept called "net neutrality." Advocates believe the Internet should remain a vast plethora of information accessible to anyone with a mouse and a connection. Others feel that Websites should pay telecommunication companies. Read more to find out what exactly is net neutrality. more...

- More US Law

One of the basic tenets of the relationship between an attorney and the client is that any information which passes between the two remains confidential. This concept is also known as the attorney client privilege. Based on early English common law, the idea of privilege is a simple one - a client maintains the privilege to refuse to disclose or to have an attorney disclose any communications that occur while one is seeking legal advice. more...

- In the Courtroom

A suburban Chicago school district's decision to monitor its students' internet postings has angered students, parents, and free speech advocates alike. Can the school district legally do this? The real freedom of speech question would arise if the school district decides to take action against a student because of a post. more...

- Privacy