Browse Privacy Articles

If you have ever watched a legal drama on television, you probably know that the police need a warrant to search your house. But did you also know that there are important exceptions to the warrant requirement? more...

- - Home & Leisure

Every American has the right to be free from unreasonable search and seizure. Did you know that in reality the police don't always need a warrant to search you. So long as there is suspcion, they can stop and frisk you for anything illegal. Read more to find out when exactly there is sufficient suspicion to stop and frisk. more...

- - Privacy

We've all seen enough crime shows to know what to do if the police knock on your door and demand to search your property. Stand, look indignant and demand to see their warrant. After all, it's your property, and unless you give permission or a judge orders the search, you should have control over what you have, right? Yes - provided you're not a student. If you're in a school environment, teachers and administrators can search without either permission or a warrant. Even so, students still have rights, and knowing which searches are illegal might just save you jail time. more...

- - Privacy

Spouses have gotten each other in trouble since Eve gave Adam that first bite of the apple; it still continues today with consequences as far reaching as the United States Constitution. When angry Janet led police to her unsuspecting husband Scott's drug stash, courts were forced to reconsider how they define one section of the Bill of Rights. The ensuing case, Georgia v. Randolph, set to be heard this fall by the U.S. Supreme Court, will decide whether one half of a married couple can waive the other's Fourth Amendment right to be free from unreasonable searches. more...

- - Privacy

Whether medical records are computerized, online, or simply on paper, there is always an element of human error and the danger of misappropriation. So, just how private are your medical records? more...

- Privacy

The recent drug and sex scandal involving Reverend Ted Haggard, founder of the New Life Church, raised questions about the truthfulness of religious leaders. But when Haggard's alleged former lover failed a lie detector test, another set of questions involving the machine itself came into play. So how reliable are lie detectors? And, are they admissible in court? more...

- Technology

When a student is suicidal, what should the university do? Or, more precisely, what is the university's legal duty, if any? These are questions that many universities are struggling to answer. Although many schools provide adequate counseling services, an increasing number of schools are resorting to banning students who have attempted suicide or who are suicidal from university housing. more...

- Privacy

One of the basic tenets of the relationship between an attorney and the client is that any information which passes between the two remains confidential. This concept is also known as the attorney client privilege. Based on early English common law, the idea of privilege is a simple one - a client maintains the privilege to refuse to disclose or to have an attorney disclose any communications that occur while one is seeking legal advice. more...

- In the Courtroom

A suburban Chicago school district's decision to monitor its students' internet postings has angered students, parents, and free speech advocates alike. Can the school district legally do this? The real freedom of speech question would arise if the school district decides to take action against a student because of a post. more...

- Privacy

Ever wondered about an ex? Ever wanted to break into their computer and spy on them whenever you want? Over a thousand people all over the world did through a program called Loverspy which was created by El Salvadorian, Carlos Enrique Perez-Melara. Read more to find out what happened. more...

- White-Collar Crime